Aging With Grace

Aging With Grace

What the Nun Study Teaches Us About Leading Longer, Healthier, and More Meaningful Lives

Book - 2002
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In 1986 Dr. David Snowdon, one of the world's leading experts on Alzheimer's disease, embarked on a revolutionary scientific study that would forever change the way we view aging--and ultimately living. Dubbed the "Nun Study" because it involves a unique population of 678 Catholic sisters, this remarkable long-term research project has made headlines worldwide with its provocative discoveries.
Yet Aging with Grace is more than a groundbreaking health and science book. It is the inspiring human story of these remarkable women--ranging in age from 74 to 106--whose dedication to serving others may help all of us live longer and healthier lives.

Totally accessible, with fascinating portraits of the nuns and the scientists who study them, Aging with Grace also offers a wealth of practical findings:

* Why building linguistic ability in childhood may protect against Alzheimer's
* Which ordinary foods promote longevity and healthy brain function
* Why preventing strokes and depression is key to avoiding Alzheimer's
* What role heredity plays, and why it's never too late to start an exercise program
* How attitude, faith, and community can add years to our lives

A prescription for hope, Aging with Grace shows that old age doesn't have to mean an inevitable slide into illness and disability; rather it can be a time of promise and productivity, intellectual and spiritual vigor--a time of true grace.
Publisher: New York ; Toronto : Bantam Books, 2002, c2001
Edition: Bantam trade pbk. ed. --
ISBN: 9780553380927
0553380923
Branch Call Number: 305.260973 Sno
Characteristics: viii, 242 p. : ill

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bookworm1387
Mar 07, 2015

One of the most important population studies ever conducted on Alzheimer's involving several hundred women with very similar lives, diet and education. The sisters agreed to undergo cognitive tests as they aged, and to donate their brains for postmortem. I wish I had read this book when my mother was ill with dementia. It would have been a tremendous help to understand her needs. The book also contains some hopeful findings on how to avoid or delay brain deterioration. Avoidance and treatment of mini-strokes (transient ischemic attacks) seems to be crucial.

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zaire189
May 09, 2013

I read this for my statistics course and it was actually a pretty good read. It really gave insight to the bad and the good involving research. It was especially interesting how David Snowdon introduced and explored the importance of the sociology of aging not only the change involving physical health.

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