Superpower

Superpower

Three Choices for America's Role in the World

Book - 2015
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America will remain the world's only superpower for the foreseeable future. But what sort of superpower? What role should America play in the world? What role do you want America to play?

Ian Bremmer argues that Washington's directionless foreign policy has become prohibitively expensive and increasingly dangerous. Since the end of the Cold War, U.S. policymakers have stumbled from crisis to crisis in Afghanistan, Iraq, Iran, Libya, Syria, and Ukraine without a clear strategy. Ordinary Americans too often base their foreign policy choices on allegiance or opposition to the party in power. We can no longer afford this complacency, especially now that both parties are deeply divided about America's role in the world. The next presidential election could easily pit an interventionist Democrat against an isolationist Republican--or the exact opposite.

As 2016 rapidly approaches, Bremmer urges every American to think more deeply about what sort of country America should be and how it should use its superpower status. He explores three options:

Independent America asserts that it's time for America to declare independence from the responsibility to solve other people's problems. Instead, Americans should lead by example--in part, by investing in the country's vast untapped potential.

Moneyball America acknowledges that Washington can't meet every international challenge. With a clear-eyed assessment of U.S. strengths and limitations, we must look beyond empty arguments over exceptionalism and American values. The priorities must be to focus on opportunities and to defend U.S. interests where they're threatened.

Indispensable America argues that only America can defend the values on which global stability increasingly depends. In today's interdependent, hyperconnected world, a turn inward would undermine America's own security and prosperity. We will never live in a stable world while others are denied their most basic freedoms--from China to Russia to the Middle East and beyond.

There are sound arguments for and against each of these choices, but we must choose. Washington can no longer improvise a foreign policy without a lasting commitment to a coherent strategy.

As Bremmer notes, "When I began writing this book, I didn't know which of these three choices I would favor. It's easy to be swayed by pundits and politicians with a story to sell or an ax to grind. My attempt to make the most honest and forceful case I could make for each of these three arguments helped me understand what I believe and why I believe it. I hope it will do the same for you. I don't ask you to agree with me. I ask only that you choose."
Publisher: New York, New York :, Portfolio Penguin,, 2015
Copyright Date: ©2015
ISBN: 9781591847472
1591847478
Branch Call Number: 327.7300905 Bre
Characteristics: viii, 226 pages ; 24 cm

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stewstealth
Nov 04, 2015

The author asks questions predicated on what American foreign policy should be going forward. The author provides three roles that the USA could adopt and provides arguments for each. The author maintains that any choice is better then no choice but does provide his own preference. Though it is fairly simplistic, there is an argument for reading the book.

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TerryJoseph
Jul 17, 2015

The author's outline of three choices for America's role in foreign affairs is helpful to consider how to vote in 2016. We recall launching into Iraq on the one hand and have now also experienced no strategy on the other hand. Do we see the need to become involved in foreign affairs for purposes of safety and security? Do we want to be isolationist? Do we want to assert our values to help others in the world? We may disagree with the author's conclusion, but the exercise is helpful and eye-opening.

s
StarGladiator
May 29, 2015

An author who believes there are no underlying agendas, that the bumbling oafs in D.C. just shuffle along, that Wall Street and the super-rich have no say in these matters? After the death of Chalmers Johnson, master redirection specialist, this must be the replacement? [Libya no only has oil, but along with Morocco, Tunisia and Egypt makes up 80% of the phosphate resource, and without phosphates, it is difficult to grow stuff!]

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